Symptoms of GERD

Adrian Park

Adrian Park M.D. FACS FRSC

Chief of general surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center and a member of the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.Dr. Park, a renowned laparoscopic surgeon, joined the University of Maryland after six years with the University of Kentucky where he was director of the Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery, head of surgical endoscopy and chief of the section of gastrointestinal surgery. In addition, he was a professor of surgery and the Commonwealth ... View full profile

John Roth

John Roth M.D. FACS

Head of surgical endoscopy at the University of Maryland Medical Center and on the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.Dr. Roth received his undergraduate degree from the College of William and Mary and went on to receive his medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia at Virginia Commonwealth University. He subsequently completed his general surgical training at the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center followed by a fellowship in minimally ... View full profile

Paul Castellanos

Paul Castellanos M.D.

Otolaryngologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center and assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He is also director of the University of Maryland Voice and Swallowing Disorders Clinic, as well as the University of Maryland Airway Clinic.After receiving his undergraduate degree from Vassar College, Dr. Castellanos completed his medical degree at Louisiana State Medical School. He continued his training at Jewish Hospital ... View full profile

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GERD: A live webcast originating from the "Operating Room of the Future" at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore will show minimally invasive surgery to treat a serious form of heartburn, called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The webcast will begin at 5:30 p.m. (21:30 UTC)on Tuesday, May 4, 2004. During the procedure, a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, surgeons will make five small incisions and use a laparoscope to repair the lower esophageal sphincter, a muscle that separates the stomach and esophagus. Read more....

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